Category: Health

O’Farrell Consigns Western Sydney to 300 Years of Nuclear Waste

Newly released documents reveal the O’Farrell Government is dumping radioactive waste – which needs to be monitored for the next 300 years – in Western Sydney.

The government’s report into moving the waste reveals:

“Long term management and monitoring (and associated funding) arrangements would need to be implemented at the disposal site for at least 300 years.” *

The feasibility review into disposal options for the waste from a former uranium smelter at Hunters Hill also shows the government has manipulated the data to avoid it being classified as radioactive – so it can be dumped at Kemps Creek.  

 “This report confirms Barry O’Farrell has broken his promise to the people of Western Sydney and is dumping radioactive waste from the North Shore in their backyard,” Opposition Leader John Robertson said.   

“The Premier’s own experts confirm the government will need to provide funding to monitor the radioactive waste for the next 300 years at Kemps Creek.

“This decision says it all about Barry O’Farrell’s real attitude to Western Sydney.” 

Shadow Environment Minister, Luke Foley said the report showed the government had found ‘radioactive hot spots’ in the waste, but twisted the data to avoid classifying it as such.

“The O’Farrell Government has manipulated the data that shows the waste is radioactive – so it can be sent to Kemps Creek,” Mr Foley said.

The report clearly states:

 “Radioactive material was detected at varying concentrations across the area… one of the samples exceeded the criteria for restricted solid waste.”

 “Therefore for the purpose of the radiological results discussion, the majority of the areas were combined into a single grouping covering the majority of the site (excluding LG4). This impacts on the potential remediation actions of the site, as the remaining areas (LG1 and LG2) will radiologically be treated as a single area.” **

 “It is clear the O’Farrell Government has reclassified the data so it can dump the North Shore’s radioactive waste in Western Sydney,” Mr Foley said.

“This report proves once and for all that Barry O’Farrell is dumping radioactive waste – that will need to be monitored until the 24th century – at Kemps Creek.”

Barry O’Farrell’s original promise to keep the waste away from Kemps Creek:

“To dump it in Western Sydney is stupid, it’s a threat, and it’s not the way any government ought to be behaving.”            (Barry O’Farrell, October 2010)

Gender and Climate Change: Durban Explores the Intersection

by Rebecca Lefton

Most people do not think of climate change as a gender issue. But experts at the COP 17 climate conference in Durban, South Africa are trying to raise awareness of the disproportionate impact that a changing climate has on women. Women are responsible for collecting water that is becoming increasingly scarce, and they are needing to travel farther distances to reach clean water supplies. Women are primarily responsible for putting food on the table, but food prices are rising and as climate change worsens agricultural productivity. And women are often the most vulnerable in war and regional conflicts, which will be exacerbated by resource scarcity.

A discussion held  in Durban focused on these impacts. The panel featured the Honorable Mary Robinson, the former president of Ireland and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. In addressing climate resilience, Robinson stressed the importance of focusing on health and burden impacts of climate change. One of the keys is access to reproductive health for women.

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Let’s Knock Down the Three Pillars of Sustainable Development

Let’s knock down the three pillars of sustainable development!  This wholly misleading picture, promoted at the 1992 Rio Earth Summit, is still around.  The 2012 Rio conference is an opportunity to replace it with a very different picture.  The “three pillars” obscure the real relationship between the economic, the social, and the environmental.  They are not equals.  “The environment” is the physical reality all life depends on.  “The social” is about one of the species within the environment, our own, organising itself.  “The economic” is in turn one sub-set of the social.  Each is nested within the next: economic within social within environmental.

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Solving Climate Change Will Help Temper Rising Health Care Costs

by Lauren Simenauer

Delegates from 194 parties are meeting in Durban, South Africa, for the annual U.N. Conference of Parties, or COP, climate change conference. Among topics being addressed is the reduction of carbon emissions worldwide, clean energy funding in lower-income nations, and the future of the Kyoto Protocol. One lesser-discussed issue that diplomats will address is the growing body of science about the impacts of climate change on global health.

The National Resources Defense Council, or NRDC, identified six natural disaster events thought to be exacerbated by climate change. Those events include ozone air pollution, heat waves, the spread of infectious disease, river flooding, hurricanes, and wildfires. Tragically, extreme weather ravaged Durban itself just days before international delegates arrived. Torrential rains caused severe flooding that destroyed 700 homes and resulted in the deaths of 10 people. But beyond the immediate effects, all these disasters have wide-reaching consequences for national health, and a study published in Health Affairs magazine estimated that health costs incurred from the tragedies exceeded $14 billion from 2000 to 2009.

In the national debate on health care, it is imperative that the international community and our lawmakers at home not ignore the value of preventing the damage that climate change will cause to both the environment and human health.

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Gamble responsibly? A mantra for profit

by Noel Preston

In an earlier piece critical of the social impact of gambling in Australia, I wrote: “Gambling creates a thirst for itself in the individual and spreads like a bushfire throughout the nation…Where is it all to end? Every added gambling facility has an effect like a rotten apple in a case…Australia faces a major problem in trying to stop a spreading contagion.

In fact I wrote this in an essay during my final year at Secondary School in 1959 – when there were hardly any pokies (or Electronic Gaming Machines as they are properly known). Fifty two years later my schoolboy forecast sounds contemporary as the Australian community debates policy proposals, spear-headed by Independent MP Andrew Wilkie, to limit the harmful impacts of pokies.

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