Putting the customer back in front: How to make electricity prices cheaper


A new report from the Grattan Institute’s Energy program, Putting the customer back in front: how to make electricity cheaper, presents a concrete set of proposals for substantially reducing the power bills of Australian households.

The main problem driving excessively high prices for consumers is that the regulation of electricity distribution networks is broken. Changes over recent years to the way distributors operate and charge customers have allowed them to make unduly high profits, given the relatively low level of risk they face.

Governments have also intervened to ensure that distributors deliver power at a level of reliability no serious cost-benefit analysis can justify.  Again, it is consumers who pay. To restore the balance, governments should:

  • Direct and empower the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) to set the parameters that determine customer costs and company profits, and ensure that the parameters are consistent with the low risks these businesses face.
  • Reduce the risk of political interference by transferring responsibility for setting reliability standards from state governments to the Australian Energy Market Commission (AEMC) and the AER, the national bodies that set and enforce the rules of the market.
  • Implement more robust corporate governance standards for government-owned businesses to ensure they operate as efficiently as those that are privately owned. Otherwise they should be privatized.
  • Prevent over-investment in the networks by empowering the AER to review the companies’ capital expenditure forecasts annually against credible market demand forecasts, and subject any over-expenditure to a rigorous cost-benefit analysis.

Recent rule changes proposed by the AEMC are going in the right direction, but are still too general to instill confidence that the desired result will be delivered.

Of course distribution companies should be allowed to make fair and reasonable profits. At the same time, regulators should not only have more resources and power – but should be directed – to act in the long-term interests of consumers.

The Report states the recommendations in this report could save customers about $2.2 billion a year, or $100 a year for every household, as well as creating a fairer, more efficient electricity distribution system.

Comments

Posted On
Dec 04, 2012
Posted By
Sacha Blumen

The Grattan institute is on the right track here, although I have not seen definitive evidence supporting the sentence ‘The main problem driving excessively high prices for consumers is that the regulation of electricity distribution networks is broken.’

What we do know for sure is that some (Labor) state governments introduced non-economic reliability standards – probably for political reasons. And now – several years later – we are possibly seeing the price impacts. This demonstrates the need to introduce economically-based reliability standards and for them to not be politically-based.

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