Posts Tagged ‘health’

Tony Abbott’s $100 Million Broken Promise on Westmead Hostpital

The Abbott Government has broken its promise not to cut hospital funding by slashing funding for Westmead Hospital by $100 million.

Treasurer Joe Hockey also slashed $12 million in funding for St George Hospital, $10 million in funding for Nepean Hospital and $6 million for a new MRI at Mount Druitt Hospital.

The $100m for Westmead Hospital was funding the first stage of redeveloping Westmead Hospital. The total redevelopment would include

a new six or seven story ‘stack’ to consolidate the complex and critical care unit;

  • an expansion of outpatient and ambulatory care;
  • refurbishment of existing infrastructure; and
  • the repositioning of the front of the hospital.

Tony Abbott’s broken promise will hurt families who rely on Westmead Hospital and the critical services it provides.

Before the election, Tony Abbott promised not to cut hospital funding – now he has cut $100 million from Westmead Hospital and other hospitals in Sydney.

These health initiatives were axed by the Abbott Government on Tuesday:

In yesterday’s MYEFO, the Abbott Government confirms the funding cut on page 104.

COMMUNITY OUTRAGE AT O’FARRELL DECISION TO DUMP RADIOACTIVE WASTE AT KEMPS CREEK

At a public meeting in Penrith last night, Western Sydney residents have expressed alarm at Barry O’Farrell’s decision to dump 5000 tonnes of radioactive waste at Kemps Creek – a stunning breach of his promise before the 2011 election.

“Barry O’Farrell is ploughing ahead with taking radioactive dirt from Hunters Hill and dumping it on the people of Western Sydney,” Shadow Environment Minister Luke Foley said today.

This is a broken promise of epic proportions.  Mr O’Farrell assured the community that this transfer would never happen – yet tonight he dispatched his bureaucrats as the fall guys for his broken promise.

  • “To dump it in Western Sydney is stupid, it’s a threat, and it’s not the way any government ought to be behaving.” Barry O’Farrell, October 2010

Last month, the O’Farrell Government issued its Final Environmental Assessment for the waste transfer – confirming local residents’ worst fears:

  • “During the proposed Remediation Works, there exists the potential for some groups of people to receive an increase in radiation exposure.” (page 124, 8.1 Radiological Hazards)
  •  ”The half-lives of the radionuclides present in the impacted soils at the site are long, and radioactivity may not attenuate for hundreds of years. As a consequence, any waste management solution would need to be effective in the very long term.” (page 148)
  •  ”In the short term there would be some environmental impacts which would require mitigation [including] …risk of ingestion/exposure to contaminated material containing radioactive tailings and chemical compounds.” (page 233)

“The Premier’s own experts have confirmed that this soil is so toxic it will need to be monitored for radioactive decay until at least the 24th century AD.  Mr O’Farrell is condemning the people of Western Sydney to 300 years of risk from radioactive material sitting within metres from streets and homes. This decision says it all about Barry O’Farrell’s real attitude to Western Sydney.”

Penrith Labor councillor Prue Car said: “Barry O’Farrell is putting the local community last. The Government can hold public meetings until it is blue in the face – the blunt truth is Mr O’Farrell misled us.
“If this soil isn’t dangerous why not keep it in Hunters Hill?  ”If it is dangerous – none of us in Western Sydney want a bar of it.”

 

O’Farrell Government’s Attacks and Cuts

Since taking office in March 2011, Barry O’Farrell and his Government have made a number of cuts to funding, jobs, workers’ rights and services. Here is an overview of what the workers of NSW have endured thus far.


Attacks on Workers’ Rights

Taken Control of IRC and Frozen Wages

-                   The Government passed the Industrial Relations (Public Sector Conditions of Employment) Act 2011. Consequently the Government has given itself complete power to determine wage increases (or not) and conditions for public sector staff through Regulations which do not have to pass any votes in the Parliament.

-                   The Industrial Relations Commission has had its power to arbitrate wage disputes removed.

-                   So far, the Government has frozen wage increases for public sector workers at 2.5%. Whilst the O’Farrell Government has claimed this will not leave public sector workers worse off, the University of Sydney’s Workplace Research Centre found that a nurse would be $12, 232 worse off and a teacher $14, 580 worse off each year had the O’Farrell policy been applied over the past decade.

Attacked Injured Workers

-                   Government amendments to the Workers Compensation Act saw significant cuts to the support and compensation provided to injured workers.

-                   The cuts to Workers Compensation means weekly payments will cease after 2.5 years and medical costs will stop being paid after 3.5 years for most injured workers.

-                   Additionally, workers will have almost non-existent coverage for accidents on their way to or from work.

-                   No lump sum payments can be made for pain and suffering, regardless of the severity of the injury.

-                   Changes to weekly benefits, medical costs and duration of payments are to apply as soon as possible to existing claims.

-                   The O’Farrell government attributed the needs for the cuts to a ‘deficit’ in WorkCover. The cuts have shifted the blame of the ‘deficit’ onto injured workers, with the Government hoping for a reduction in insurance premiums for employers.

 

Stripped Police of their Death and Disability Protection

-                   The Government’s Police Amendment (Death and Disability) Act 2011 severely cut the support and rehabilitation provided to police who are injured on the job, as well as support for families of police officers killed at work.

Attacked Workers’ Rights to Fairly Bargain Collectively

-                   Currently before Parliament is the Government’s Industrial Relations Amendment (Dispute Orders) Bill 2012. If this Bill is passed, it will increase fines for taking industrial action from $10,000 a day to $110,000 a day.

-                   It is also important to remember as mentioned above that unions no longer have the right to independent arbitration over wages and conditions and unlike the Federal industrial relations system have no legal right to strike through protected action.

No Consultation around Significant Industrial Changes

-                   By way of example The Technical and Further Education Commission Amendment (Staff Employment) Act 2011 saw 13,000 TAFE teachers transferred to the Federal industrial relations system where they now fall under the Fair Work Act

-                   No consultations with unions or teachers were attempted prior to the introduction and subsequent passing of this Act.

-                   Similarly, Government abolished the Transport Appeals Board with no discussion with unions.

Forcing Retail Workers to Work on Public Holidays

-                   The Retail Trading Amendment Bill 2012 presented by the O’Farrell Government will allow all retailers to trade on Boxing Day and Easter Sunday which will see employees being forced to work on what should be a day for families.

-                   The Bill will also lead to backroom staff and staff of retail businesses working on Christmas Day and Good Friday.

 No Support for Equal Pay

-                   The most recent State budget has not allocated any funding to equal pay for social and community sector workers in line with the recent Fair Work findings.

-                   There are 30,000 community and public sector workers in NSW. Without NSW funding these workers will not receive the awarded increases in full which range from 19 – 41 per cent.

-                   Prior to the election O’Farrell promised social and community sector workers a fair and equitable pay rise.

Slashing Public Sector Entitlements

-                   The O’Farrell Government has applied to the NSW Industrial Relations Commission to change 98 different Public Sector Awards and enact massive cuts to entitlements and benefit.

-                   Some of the cuts include: slashing annual leave loading, cutting penalty rates for shift workers, removal of additional sick leave entitlements and parental leave.

Sharp rise in youth homelessness shatters stereotypes

by James Farrell

The number of Australians who were homeless on census night increased by 17% to 105,237 in the five years to August 2011. When adjusted for population growth, the increase the increase is still worryingly high, at around 8%. It’s clear we need a stronger commitment to address this significant social issue.

The census data, released this week by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), continues to shatter the stereotype of homelessness: the middle-aged alcoholic or drug-addicted man sleeping in a park.

Rather, 60% of people experiencing homelessness were under 35 years old, and an incredible 17% were aged under ten. The ABS acknowledges that census methodology is likely to underestimate youth homelessness, so the number is probably higher than the estimated 44,083 Australians under 25 currently recognised as homelessness.

As subsequent research from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare shows, these young people will be more likely to be involved in child protection and juvenile justice services, further entrenching their disadvantage.

Almost half (44%) of homeless Australians were women; with women and children the fastest growing group seeking assistance from specialist homelessness services. This number, however, does not include women and children remaining in unsafe housing and continuing violent relationships. The ABS recognises that data sources other than the census must be used to better understand the incidence of family violence and the consequences on housing security and homelessness.

In welcome news, the number of people “sleeping rough” (in improvised dwellings, tents or sleeping out) decreased from 7,247 in 2006 to 6,813 in 2011. But more people are sheltered in such substandard overcrowded housing as to warrant being classed as being homeless; this group increased from 31,531 in 2006 to 41,390 in 2011.

The homelessness rate grew by more than 20% in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, with a gob-smacking 70% rise in the ACT. Meanwhile, the largest fall was in the Northern Territory, which still has (by far) the highest proportion of people experiencing homelessness (731 people per 100,000 population, compared with a national average of 48.9).

The ABS has acknowledged it has further work to do to understand and measure homelessness experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, which goes a long way to explaining the NT’s massive homelessness rates.

The ABS report has been the subject of significant media coverage, much of it couched in terms of the failure of governments to reduce homelessness. But given the social and economic changes since 2006, it’s surprising that the growth wasn’t higher.

Rather than whacking governments, the ABS data shows a need for governments to continue their efforts to address homelessness.

 

 Committing to end homelessness

The Commonwealth’s 2008 white paper on homelessness, The Road Home, boldly aims to halve homelessness by 2020 and offer accommodation to all rough sleepers. Similarly, states and territories have introduced bold and targeted action plans to address homelessness.

These commitments have been underpinned by important agreements between the Commonwealth and the states and territories. The National Affordable Housing Agreement (NAHA) focuses on early intervention and prevention strategies, better assistance for people with multiple support needs, and providing ongoing assistance to ensure stability for clients post-crisis. The National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH) outlines funding arrangements for specific projects and commits partners to addressing agreed outcomes through program delivery.

But these agreements end in June 2013, making the next few months a vital time for the agreements to be renegotiated. At his address to the National Press Club this week, Housing Minister Brendan O’Connor committed to providing half the funds required for another year while the NPAH is renegotiated.

The states are yet to meet this commitment and are seeking additional resources from the Commonwealth. Details will be discussed at today’s meeting of housing ministers in Brisbane.

In addition to resourcing, more work needs to be done to ensure homelessness services are sufficiently funded and effectively delivered. To achieve this, we need to establish a monitoring system with nationally consistent, evidence-based measures to assess the effectiveness of homelessness services. This will allow us to focus on the outcomes of people experiencing or at risk of homelessness, rather than just on the number of people being provided with services.

As the ABS figures show, homelessness continues to be a social crisis in Australia today. Governments, and the broader community, must redouble their commitments to address, and ultimately end, this significant social policy challenge.

James Farrell is currently a Director of the Council to Homeless Persons, Treasurer of the Federation of Community Legal Centres and the National Association of Community Legal Centres and a member of the StreetSmart Australia grants committee.

This article was first published at www.theconversation.edu.au

 

Censoring public health in Queensland – a dangerous precedent?

Beyond the recent publicity around cuts to health and other portfolios, something deeply disturbing – even sinister – is occurring in Queensland.

The state government is implementing health policies on the run and cutting health jobs and services. This has happened before around the country and will eventually be turned around, albeit not before a deal of harm has been done.

Even this week, there is news of yet more cuts to prevention programs. But more disturbing still, and a move that should send alarm bells ringing around the country, is the Queensland government’s decision to gag health organisations, health professionals and public debate on health issues.

A number of of Queensland Health’s recent problems – from Bundaberg to payroll disasters – followed historical underfunding of key control processes, and came to light in part because concerned people had the courage to speak out.

There is a long history in public health of measures that were initially resisted or opposed, speedily becoming accepted as part of a modern, civilised society. We would not be one of the world’s longest-lived populations without advances in public health such as sanitation and safe water, safe food, safe environments, immunisation, control of infectious diseases, screening, speed limits, seat belts, random breath testing, and tobacco control.

Each of these advances met initial resistance. None of them – not a single one of the public health advances we now regard as vital – would have been implemented without public health advocacy.

A troubled history

There is nothing new about opposition to public health advocacy. When sanitary reforms were being debated in England in the 1850s, led by the pioneering epidemiologist John Snow, the London Times thundered, “We prefer to take our chances of cholera and the rest than be bullied into health by Mr. Snow”.

But Snow persevered, achieving changes that led the way to advances there and elsewhere. Since then, we have seen a plethora of public health advances because of pressure from health groups, whether professional organisations such as the Australian Medical Association (AMA), or issue-based non-governmental organisations (NGOs), such as the various cancer councils and the Heart Foundation.

These external pressures are often encouraged by health ministers who need help generating support for action in Cabinet and the community: after legislation or other action, they frequently express their appreciation to the organisations concerned.

It is reasonable and normal for governments to expect that public servants follow conventional protocols in relation to public comment. It is also reasonable to expect that NGOs engaged in advocacy do so in a sensible and civilised manner. It is, however, unreasonable and dangerous for governments to gag health NGOs, and to take action that will specifically preclude them from advocating for change.

Gagging order

Health departments traditionally fund large numbers of NGOs to carry out crucial work in the community. Queensland Health Department contracts with these NGOs will now be subject to censorship. Any NGO receiving 50% or more of its funding from the state will be precluded from advocating for state or federal legislative change – even from providing website links to other organisations’ websites that do so.

NGOs justifiably fear that the 50% figure is just a starting point, and that this censorship may ultimately apply to any funding. Many now dare not speak out. Even those not currently in receipt of funding but thinking of applying will feel constrained.

The condition relating to websites means that funded NGOs may not be able to provide links to organisations such as Cancer Council Australia, the Heart Foundation, or even the AMA and the World Health Organization, all of which advocate for legislative change.

Government-funded NGOs are often also funders of research, which may conclude that legislation or regulation is appropriate. The new Queensland Health approach will preclude reputable health organisations from even discussing the implications of such research.

An important 2007 paper showed that there was already cause for concern about suppression of information in the health sector. It noted international precedents where exposure and comment from outside government were crucial in preventing further public health catastrophes, such as the 1980 Black Report in the United Kingdom, the Chernobyl disaster in the Soviet Union, the SARS outbreak in China, and harmful mercury blood levels in the United States.

But why?

So what justification has the Queensland Government offered for its descent into the dark ages?

First, they assert that NGOs should focus on their “core activities”, not advocacy. But seeking action that will protect the health of the community is the most fundamental core activity for public health organisations. Even if they cannot understand this, it is outrageous that a government providing only some of an organisation’s funding should prohibit action carried out with funding from other sources.

Second, they state in relation to funded groups that “we would expect that organisation to conduct itself with the political impartiality of any other government sector.” This verges on the bizarre, given that by definition NGOs are not part of the “government sector”.

A third rationale now offered is that this condition will prevent abuses, such as the “Fake Tahitian Prince” scandal, and funding of NGOs to pursue political agendas. But any concerns in these areas should be addressed by protocols common to all governments (and indeed other funding agencies) about proper, well-monitored use of funds.

The fourth rationale is that the government is seeking “health outcomes, not political outcomes or social engineering outcomes”. The government is entitled to seek health outcomes from activities that it funds: but that is no justification for gagging the non-government sector.

It is desperately depressing that any health minister should use pejorative phrases such as “social engineering” to describe the aims of health organisations, and, by implication, the aims of his own and other health departments around the country.

The Queensland government’s approach has already met with some success. It has created a climate of fear. Beyond the AMA, whose Queensland president, Dr. Alex Markwell, has shown herself to be a true health leader, and some courageous public health academics, few in the state are willing to speak out, lest they be victimised and lose their funding.

These are dark days for public health in Queensland. The public health advocacy that has made our community so healthy will be hard to find. By contrast, commercial interests – in areas such as alcohol, tobacco, gambling, junk food, even firearms – are free to pressure governments at will.

Queensland, of all states, should have learned that gagging people in health from speaking out is a recipe for disaster. Censorship is the hallmark of a totalitarian regime; censorship in health sends out the signal loud and clear that the government neither understands public health nor cares for the future health of the community.

Other governments should condemn the Queensland approach though the Standing Council of Health Ministers; the Federal Government should bring all possible pressure to bear; and health professionals around the nation should use every available opportunity to make clear their distaste for this fundamentally unhealthy approach to public health.

Public health has been described as the conscience of the health system. It should be a matter of great concern for the entire community that any government is seeking to silence our conscience.

Mike Daube is Professor of Health Policy at Curtin University.

This article was first published online at The Conversation

 


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