Posts Tagged ‘United States’

Chomsky and conflicting elements of US foreign policy

by John August

I’ve long been interested in Chomsky’s writings, but I could always see good and bad in them. I’ve struggled to understand foreign policy and how the US fits in. It’s different to the picture painted by both Chomsky and his opponents.

After Chomsky won the Sydney Peace Prize, people railed against the Sydney Centre for Peace And Conflict Studies (SPAC) – again. Keith Windshuttle came to the fore, joined by Ted Lapkin – with lots more material out there. But, even if the SPAC are wrong, however heated his opponents get, it’s not illegal to be wrong – at least not yet, anyway.

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Two Peas in a Pod

By Thomas L. Friedman

The world’s two biggest democracies, India and the United States, are going through remarkably similar bouts of introspection. Both countries are witnessing grass-roots movements against corruption and excess. The difference is that Indians are protesting what is illegal — a system requiring bribes at every level of governance to get anything done. And Americans are protesting what is legal— a system of Supreme Court-sanctioned bribery in the form of campaign donations that have enabled the financial-services industry to effectively buy the U.S. Congress, and both political parties, and thereby resist curbs on risk-taking.

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A Preview of the November 11-13, 2011 APEC Leaders’ Meeting

by Joshua Meltzer
The United States is this year’s host of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit later this week. APEC leaders will meet in Hawaii, accompanied by their foreign and trade ministers and a host of senior officials. The United States will attend APEC with some important trade policy outcomes under its belt already, most significantly the passage of the Korea-U.S. free trade agreement (FTA), Columbia-U.S. FTA and Panama-U.S. FTA. Particularly, the Korea-U.S. FTA and progress in the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations will help the United States show its serious commitment to pursuing international agreements that liberalize trade and investment in the Asia Pacific region.
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One Year to Go: President Barack Obama’s Uphill Battle for Reelection in 2012

by  Bill Galston

Despite recent signs of a modest upturn in President Barack Obama’s political fortunes, the 2012 election is likely to be close and hard-fought. More than in any contest since 1992, the economy will be the overwhelming focus. But fundamental clashes about the role of government will also be in play against a backdrop of record low public confidence in our governing institutions. And contests involving incumbents tend to be referenda on their records more than choices between candidates. If the election pitting Obama against the strongest potential Republican nominee, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, were held tomorrow, the president would probably lose.

But a year is a very long time in American politics, and three factors could change the odds in Obama’s favor.  Economic growth could exceed expectations, and the unemployment rate—long stuck at 9 percent—could come down fast enough to restore a modicum of Americans’ shattered hopes for the future.  The Republicans could commit creedal suicide by nominating a presidential candidate outside the mainstream or unqualified for the office.  And the Obama campaign could make a wise decision to focus first and foremost on the states—principally in the Midwest—that have decided presidential elections in the past half century and are poised to do so again next year.  If the president tries to rerun his 2008 campaign under very different circumstances, he could end up turning potential victory into defeat.

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We May Be Witnessing the First Large Global Conflict Where People Are Aligned by Consciousness and Not Nation State or Religion

By Naomi Wolf
They’re fighting a “corporatocracy” that has bought governments, created armed enforcers, engaged in systemic economic fraud, and plundered treasuries and ecosystems.
America’s politicians, it seems, have had their fill of democracy. Across the country, police, acting under orders from local officials, are breaking up protest encampments set up by supporters of the Occupy Wall Street (OWS) movement – sometimes with shocking and utterly gratuitous violence.

In the worst incident so far, hundreds of police, dressed in riot gear, surrounded Occupy Oakland’s encampment and fired rubber bullets (which can be fatal), flash grenades and tear-gas canisters – with some officers taking aim directly at demonstrators. The Occupy Oakland Twitter feed read like a report from Cairo’s Tahrir Square: “they are surrounding us”; “hundreds and hundreds of police”; “there are armoured vehicles and Hummers”. There were 170 arrests.

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